Denial of Service: Meteor APM Agent

I got the following announcement yesterday from the development team at Meteor. For any of my peer who develop apps utilizing Meteor, should probably take note of this. Happy coding…

Continue reading

Advertisements

JavaScript: The OOP Comparison Conundrum

JavaScript is not an object-oriented programming language like C# or Java! That’s my opinion and it’s informed, which means by the definition of one of my old college philosophy instructors it’s worth having and expressing. But understand my context, please. To do that I’ll step back and break this down before I dive into the details. Is JavaScript a programming language that can contain objects and constructs? YES! Is Javascript object-oriented? YES! Is JavaScript an object-oriented programming language compared to languages like C# and Java? NO!

Continue reading

Implement OWIN inside of .NET Core

It seems ironic that up until pretty recently, adding OWIN—an open source standard of decoupling server and application code—wasn’t all that easy to do inside the same open source concept of .NET Core. Mostly it appears we had to rely on Kestrel do the serving, particularly whenever we would create a .NET Core web application from the CLI. What I’m going to present for your inspection today is how easy it is to convert a .NET Core application that is pointing to the full .NET Framework to utilize OWIN to remove the application/server dependencies from one another without major breakage. Or… er, well, ahem… at least to minimize the heartache and cursing.

Continue reading

CLI Creation of .NET Core Apps

Something I discovered early about .NET Core was how easy it was to get started. This is due in no small part to the dotnet command line interface. In its earliest releases, .NET Core utilized the dnu and dnx that felt pretty clunky to use, in my opinion. Then the Microsoft team released the dotnet command line changes to the toolchain and that transition made working with the CLI feel much smoother.

Continue reading

Book Review: Headlong Flight (ST:TNG)

Having become an increasingly frequent reader of Star Trek novels in the past couple of years, I’ve observed that the books seem to be getting better by orders of magnitude. Sure, the series has a stable of good writers, but so have other media tie-in series and they have suffered deplorably. Not so with Star Trek: The Next Generation: Headlong Flight. This one kept my attention rapt through the entire book, and not for just a few reasons. First, there are the characterizations and dialog that Mr. Ward has captured as spot-on. From Data to Captain Riker (yes, you read that correctly), it felt very much as if I were watching a two-part episode right from the series.

Continue reading

Welcome to Code Vet!

Greetings, Nerd dizzles! I’ve programmed in a lot of languages over the nearly two decades I’ve been in the software engineering field. Better than half that time I’ve spent in various framework iterations of ASP.NET, C#, and SQL Server. Most of what I’ve done has been “old school.” In other words, building n-tier applications using object-oriented programming and ADO.NET. I’ve been doing that for so long, I guess I’ve become somewhat of a curmudgeon about it, at least if you compare what me to these young, new hotshot developers just coming out of school and building their own startups.

Continue reading